After Former NBC Host Ann Curry Found A Lump In Her Breast, The Doctor's Words Made Her Change Her Life Completely

How a health scare transformed Ann Curry's life

Ann Curry is one of the most memorable hosts of NBC’s Today Show. Curry spent more than two decades with the network before her departure in 2015. She’s interviewed some of the most influential people in the world and reported from war zones and areas hit by natural disasters, but there’s something else that made her really appreciate life.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ann Curry (@anncurry) on

READ ALSO: Woman Noticed A Weird Symptom Of Breast Cancer And Started An Awareness Campaign To Warn Others

About a decade ago, Curry found a lump in her breast. Her sister hah had very aggressive breast cancer, so Curry went to have the lump checked.

Fortunately, the lump turned out to be benign. But the doctor’s words had a profound impact on Curry’s life. In an interview with O, The Oprah Magazine, she said:

[The doctor] told me, "Every day I have to tell a woman she's got a disease that might kill her. Each one of them says, 'I didn't get a chance to do this,' or 'I should have done that.' I don't want you to be one of those women." He suggested I take one day a week to "connect"—not just with family or friends or God, but with myself. He said I ought to make sure I was setting aside time to do what fulfilled me.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Working as a host on national TV and raising two kids sure is a demanding job, but the doctor’s words sank in. Curry took some time to think about it and realized: She could pace herself and indulge in some me-time occasionally, all without hurting her career and family life!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Curry started working out and “eating her greens,” she told the magazine. She also started to devote more time to her long-time passion – photography. She said:

Photography had always been on the top of my 'shoulda coulda woulda' list, so once a week, I started telling my family, 'I need 30 minutes to go shoot some pictures'. I gradually upped the time, walking around my neighborhood snapping photos. My two kids protested my absence at first, but when they saw the pictures, they began to understand.

Although that health scare was nothing more than just a scare, it really helped the famous journalist value her time.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Ann Curry (@anncurry) on

READ ALSO: Christina Applegate Beat Breast Cancer After Catching It Early, But Her Health Struggles Didn't End There

A word on breast cancer

Ann Curry did the right thing when she went to have that lump checked. Although breast lumps usually turn out to be benign, sometimes they don't.

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting women. It’s estimated that 1 in 8 women will develop the disease at some point in their lives.

Fortunately, deaths from breast cancer have been on the decline, thanks to increasing awareness, better treatments, and early detection.

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Speaking about early detection, regular screenings can help catch the disease before it has the chance to spread. For women at an average risk of breast cancer, the American Cancer Society recommends yearly mammograms starting at age 40.

Women who have a higher risk should start screenings earlier. If you have any risk factors, such as a family history, discuss your options with your doctor. Additional imaging tests, such as MRIs and ultrasounds, may be recommended.

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Every woman, regardless of her age, should get familiar with what her breasts normally look and feel like, and report any unusual changes to her doctor.

Remember this: breast cancer does not discriminate; it can affect anyone. If you think something is off with your breasts, don’t hesitate to tell your doctor about it.

READ ALSO: Theresa Caputo Shared A Very Private Moment To Remind All Women About The Importance Of Getting Screened For Breast Cancer