"My Son Could Have Died": Mom Warns Other Parents About A Seemingly Harmless Snack That Almost Ended Her Son's Life

Asthma is a common condition, and most people who have it know their triggers quite well. But sometimes, a seemingly harmless item can lead to a severe - even life-threatening - asthma attack, as one Florida family has learned.

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Johnny’s story

Racheal McKenny went to the mall with her husband and two kids. There, her son and daughter saw a stand selling a snack called ‘Dragon’s breath’ and asked to try it. The kids were excited about the treat because of its special feature: it contains liquid nitrogen and allows you to breathe out “smoke” as if you were a dragon.

On their way back home, the family realized the treat was not as harmless as it seemed. Racheal’s son, Johnny, who has mild asthma, started coughing. The boy’s coughing got worse, and in a matter of minutes he was struggling to breathe.

Johnny’s parents knew they had to get help immediately. Fortunately, the boy’s dad knew about the nearest fire station and took him there. The EMTs administered treatment and handed the boy over to the ambulance once it arrived, and his condition was finally stabilized.

The boy is doing fine now, according to his mother. After their ordeal was over, she took to Facebook and wrote a post to warn other parents whose kids have asthma.

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What is asthma, and what triggers its symptoms?

Asthma is a common condition in which the airways become constricted, and that causes coughing and shortness of breath. For some people, asthma isn’t much of a problem, and they rarely have symptoms. However, asthma can be severe and interfere with regular activities.

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Even people who have mild asthma, like Johnny does, should carry an inhaler with them. If an exposure to a previously unknown asthma trigger occurs, the inhaler can provide quick relief and help the person breathe better until the ambulance arrives (if it's needed).

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Common asthma triggers include allergens (such as pollen, pet dander, and mold), cold air, intense physical activity, stress and intense emotions, respiratory infections (such as the flu or common cold), and air pollutants (such as exhaust fumes and smoke).

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There are also other, lesser-known triggers of asthma attacks. These include certain food additives (like liquid nitrogen in Johnny’s case, which isn’t commonly added to foods; sulfites and monosodium glutamate are also on this list), acid reflux, alcohol, certain medicines (such as aspirin and acetaminophen), air fresheners, deodorant sprays, and scented candles.

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If you or your loved one has asthma, identify the triggers and avoid them as much as possible. Also, carry asthma medicines with you in case of emergency. Stay safe!

Source: Fox News, Mayo Clinic, Everyday Health

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This article is solely for informational purposes. Before using any of the information provided above, consult a certified specialist. Use of the information outlined above can be harmful to health. The editorial board does not guarantee any results and does not bear any responsibility for harm or other consequences that may result from the use of the information provided above.

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