Real Life Jungle Book: 63-Year-Old Woman Who Was Abandoned In A Jungle As A Kid Opens Up About Her Experience

The occurrence of the Mowgli syndrome, or the Feral child as it is more commonly known, is not as rare as some people might think. Feral children essentially are children who from an early age grew without human contact. As a result, they have no experience of care and love in a social setting or even human language. These children usually grow up in the wild in isolation or, much like the popular Mowgli from the story “The Jungle Book,” are brought up by animals. More than a 100 cases of feral children have been reported, but the case of Marina Chapman is the one that has recently gotten a lot of people talking.

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According to the 63-Year-old housewife, she was brought up by monkeys. Contrary to what most people would think, it isn't exactly a tree swinging, banana eating, poo-throwing fiesta like the movies project. Marina Chapman recounts spending the early part of her childhood, spanning age 4 to age 9 in the Columbian jungle, among Capuchin monkeys.

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Some of the details of her story, such as the reason why she was taken from her family or how she got to the jungle, are unclear, but she clearly remembers living with the monkeys for five years. Fortunately, Marina was rescued by some hunters, and the next part of her journey played out like a Hollywood movie gearing for an Oscar award.

After her rescue, Marina was given to a brothel keeper who she escaped from, only to fall into the hands of an abusive family who kept her captive as a slave. Luckily for her, her story took a turn for the better as a family living in Bogota, adopted her. In the year 1977, the family sent their children off to Yorkshire and Marina along with them as a nanny. Sometime later, she married a local scientist and birthed two children.

Many scientists, had their interest piqued by Marina's story which was documented in a book by her daughter titled "The Girl With No Name."  And they have tried to test the authenticity of her claim. A professor of psychology in London concluded that, despite there being some truth to her story, it seems Marina was suffering from “False memories” which has weaved the story into the fantastical piece that it is. Another professor, from Columbia this time, after conducting tests, concluded, from her responses, that her story is indeed true.

While most people are interested in the veracity of the story, Marina has indicated that the only thing she cares about, is finding the monkeys, confident that they'll remember her. Wouldn't that be a perfect ending to this amazing story?

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