NEWS

"We Got Very, Very Lucky": Mother Of A Shark Attack Victim In San Diego In Tears During Press Conference

Date October 3, 2018 16:53

On Monday, October 1, Ellie Hayes finally spoke to the media following the horrific shark attack that left her 13-year-old son, Keane Webre-Hayes, hospitalized. Speaking about the incident, Ellie Hayes said it was a miracle her son survived.

Keane is still on admission at the Rady Children's Hospital in San Diego. His mother confirmed that he is responding to the treatment and eats solid food after doctors stabilized him.

In her address to the press, emotional Ellie could not hold back the tears as she thanked her son’s rescuers for jumping in as he was getting attacked by the shark.

We got very, very lucky, and we know it, and we are very thankful.

Dr. Tim Fairbanks, chief of pediatric surgery at Rady's, explained that Keane is still in critical condition. The shark bite tore into his chest wall and caused damage to his left upper back, shoulder, torso, face, and ear. Thankfully, his vascular system was not damaged.

Keane wants you to know he has all his limbs, and he's going to be going home fully intact. We're thrilled to be where we are right now. But we still need to get him across the finish line and get him all the way better.

READ ALSO: Aquatic Terror: 13-Year-Old Boy Was Viciously Attacked By An 11-Foot Shark On California

What really happened?

Keane and his friends were diving for lobsters on September 29, about 150 yards off the shore of San Diego suburb of Encinitas. His mother was some distance away on shore when the shark attacked. Three people on the scene swooped in so as to rescue Keane, placing him on a kayak and paddling him to shore.

Emergency service arrived shortly after and airlifted Keane to the hospital.

What to do if a shark shows up

Swimming in the ocean can be very dangerous for obvious reasons. While some shorelines may be relatively safe, sharks often stray a lot closer to the shore, and the activity in the water can trigger them. For starters, do not panic. Try to get out of the water as calmly as possible. Sharks can mistake thrashing for a potential prey. Always stay in front of the shark and maintain eye contact if possible.

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If close to the shore, slowly back away from the shark, but if underwater, curl into a ball. Sharks are less likely to attack a prone figure. However, if the shark starts to swim in zig-zag motions, it is gearing up for an attack. Open up and make yourself as large as possible.

If you have no other way to escape, find an object that can be used as a weapon and aim for the eyes and gills. These areas are sensitive, and hitting them will discourage the shark from attacking.

READ ALSO: Town In New York Reopens Beaches Shortly After Suspected Shark Attacks On 2 Children