10 Everyday Objects Most People Don't Know The Use Of

Inspiration

How many times have we asked ourselves what something is for? There are even times when our children, nieces and nephews, or any small child ask us about the use of some objects and we don't know what to tell them.

That's why we'll help you identify some everyday objects to know about their proper use. Pay attention!

1. Switch on the rear-view mirror

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This switch is very useful, and it's important for you to know it's "day/night" function. This helps stop you from being blinded by the headlights of cars behind you while driving at night. The rear-view mirror has double the mirroring space which you can always change by flipping the switch. You might have already known this one, but if you know somebody who's new to driving, pass on this information.

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2. Replacement blades for box cutter

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Most people don't know that a blade which no longer cuts on a box cutter can be removed. All you have to do is snap off the blade and reveal a new one underneath. You might think it's difficult, but it's really easy. All you need to do is take the cover and break off the part which is no longer sharp.

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3. Code on cosmetics

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If you're a makeup lover, you might know the use of this code on your beauty products. You can see a small, open container with 6M, 12M, or 24M. These numbers relate to the shelf life of your cosmetics: 6, 12, or 24 months of use. Remember when you bought them; you can note the date on your phone, a notebook, or on the container itself.

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4. The number 57 on Heinz bottles

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This really is strange because it's actually very useful. When it becomes difficult for the ketchup to come out of the bottle, tilt it and give it a few taps with your hand on the area of the number 57. You'll be surprised how well this works.

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5. The black hole next to the iPhone camera

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If you're an iPhone fan, you need to know the use of this little hole. It's actually an auxiliary microphone and is specifically designed so that when you record a video, the sound quality is much better. It's also a useful tool for Apple's intelligent assistant, Siri, since it allows it to recognize accents and reduce noise captured by the main microphone.

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6. Patches on backpacks

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It's likely you think that the patch on your backpack is part of the design. However, it has an unusual function: This component serves to put loops through its openings and, therefore, carry extra equipment. It's very useful for those who often go camping.

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7. “Pocket” in women's underwear

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Most women have probably noticed that there is a little pocket in the inside of their underwear. It's not designed to store money or any other kind of object; it's simply a double lining of fabric (required by health regulations) which can't be sewn because it's impossible. One side is stitched and the other is not. That's why it looks like some kind of pocket.

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8. Creases on pants

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Because of fashion, creases on pants aren't used much anymore, but they had an important use centuries ago in Europe. Clothing factories sent their products to other countries. To save space and pack as many items as possible, they compressed them and when they were unpacked, these creases were formed which were almost impossible to remove. Later, these creases in pants became fashionable.

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9. Holes in lollipop sticks

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Many believe that this hole is so children don't choke in case they swallow the sticks. Their real function is to help make sure the candy doesn't fall off. First, the hole is filled with the candy which acts as a safe fixing point while the candy is still liquid. When it hardens, it's now a base to stop the candy from falling.

10. Pompom on a knit cap

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They look nice, but they're not there for aesthetics. Pompoms appeared in the 18th century among French sailors. Boats at that time were smaller, and the pompom helped to protect their heads from being hit. It's now merely a decoration, although it can be very useful in areas with low ceilings.

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So now you know it, you can go and show your family and friends how erudite you are!

READ ALSO: 5 Useless Cosmetic Products

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