Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset O

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?

Lifestyle & Health

February 7, 2019 14:57 By Fabiosa

With age, many people begin to fear that their lives will be clouded by the so-called senile diseases. Earlier we wrote about dementia and Alzheimer's, as well as the correlation between the latter and a habit of taking day naps in mature age. Even though there is no 100% reliable prevention, the development of these diseases can be delayed in case of early detection and competent medical care. The same goes for Parkinson's.

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?Ruslan Guzov / Shutterstock.com

This is a progressive nervous system disorder affecting coordination and movement. One of the first symptoms of the disease is the appearance of a barely noticeable tremor in one of the hands, gradually spreading to the other limbs.

READ ALSO: By Now Michael J. Fox Should Be Overcome By Parkinson's, But He Fights And Helps Others To Survive

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?Chinnapong / Shutterstock.com

Early signs often go unnoticed. Besides tremors, they include:

  • slowed movement (you start taking shorter steps, it gets difficult to change the body position);
  • rigid muscles, accompanied by painful sensations when moving;
  • reduced ability to maintain balance;
  • slowed and slurred speech;
  • loss of automatic movements (blinking, smiling, swinging your arms when walking, holding objects, etc.).

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?BlurryMe / Shutterstock.com

Parkinson's disease is caused by the gradual death of nerve cells in the brain that results in impaired communication between its divisions. Medicinal therapy and quality care can slow down the development of this condition.

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?BlurryMe / Shutterstock.com

Few people know that there is another early symptom of Parkinson's. It is impaired visual function, which manifests itself in:

  • difficulty in moving and focusing the eyes;
  • unexplained dryness of the cornea;
  • the eyelids closing involuntarily;
  • loss of visual acuity in the dark;
  • a reduced ability to perceive colors;
  • blurred and double vision.

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?Olena Zaskochenko / Shutterstock.com

If you or one of your relatives has been diagnosed with Parkinson's, you should know that it isn’t a death sentence. It is better to focus on how to make life as comfortable as possible.

READ ALSO: Should You Send Your Elderly Parents To A Nursing Home If You Can't Care For Them?

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?De Visu / Shutterstock.com

Planning a day or a longer ahead will help you better manage your time and ensure the necessary amount of physical activities and recreation.

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?DenisProduction.com / Shutterstock.com

You should also watch your nutrition: balance your diet, cut out sugar, salt, unhealthy fats, and high cholesterol foods. It is also recommended to drink plenty of water.

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?Two retired people having breakfast togetherRawpixel.com / Shutterstock.com

People with Parkinson’s can lose their balance and fall. To avoid this, you can equip all rooms with handrails. It is advisable to abandon the use of heating and gas appliances. A phone with emergency services and those who can come to the rescue fast on speed dial should always easily accessible.

Sneaky Parkinson’s: How Can Your Eyes Indicate The Onset Of The Disease Before The Main Symptoms?Elderly couple dancingwavebreakmedia / Shutterstock.com

No disease is pleasant, and Parkinson's is no exception. You don’t have to be alone in it – the problem can and should be discussed with relatives.

READ ALSO: Alzheimer's-Stricken 80-Year-Old Was Abandoned In The Cruelest Way: Sent Alone On A Plane To A Distant City


This article is solely for informational purposes. Do not self-diagnose or self-medicate, and in all cases consult a certified healthcare professional before using any information presented in the article. The editorial board does not guarantee any results and does not bear any responsibility for any harm that may result from using the information provided in the article.