But What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing Jeans

Lifehacks

May 8, 2019 17:27 By Fabiosa

We all want to look neat and well-groomed, even if we don’t wear the world’s most expensive or stylish clothes. For most people, life is an endless series of long-established routine, including laundry and ironing. Earlier, we wrote about how to unshrink a cashmere or woolen sweater and some useful hacks to preserve the color of black clothes.

But What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansBut What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing Jeansikoimages / Shutterstock.com

It is everyone’s own decision how often to wash their clothes, but it is hard to imagine someone could question this necessity, isn’t it? However, there is a quite authoritative opinion regarding denim clothing. Levi's president and CEO, Chip Bergh, is confident that it shouldn’t be washed, at least too often.

But What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansBut What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing Jeansautumn fashion styleNesolenaya Alexandra / Shutterstock.com

He told this to Fortune’s reporters. Mr. Bergh is a huge fan of jeans, which he considers comfortable and practical. However, this item is quite capricious when it comes to washing.

But What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansBut What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansGetty Images / Ideal Image

During wear, the fabric forms natural folds that enable the product to “adjust” to the parameters of the wearer, but friction with frequent washing stretches denim and leaches the pigment from it.

But What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansBut What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansNesolenaya Alexandra / Shutterstock.com

Levi's, one of the leading manufacturers of denim clothing, has been constantly striving to perfect their product. Cutting edge technologies of processing and dyeing the fabric allow their clothing items to look great for a long time. Chip Bergh stressed the fact that machine washing contributes to faster wear and should be used only as a last resort.

But What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansBut What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansAlena Ozerova / Shutterstock.com

The company's specialists have also studied their products’ impact on the environment. Considering that denim fabric doesn’t require frequent washing, they came to the conclusion that it would save on water usage.

But What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansBut What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansOlesya Kuprina / Shutterstock.com

Of course, this doesn’t mean that Mr. Bergh has worn dirty clothes for years and encourages us to do so. He has always washed his own jeans when needed (the pair that he wore to the interview didn’t look too shabby), but only by hand. He advised dealing with small stains with the help of a toothbrush and soap solution. You can freshen up your jeans by airing or using household fragrances. To get rid of germs, you can place them in a freezer for a while.

But What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansGetty Images / Ideal Image

Without a doubt, frequent washing does lead to faster wear. But people differ and you can stain your clothes by accident. Even a pair of jeans you wore once is covered with microbes from the surface of our bodies and the environment. Most of them don’t pose a threat to health, so perhaps, there is really no reason to throw your jeans in the laundry basket right after reading this. But what to do with stains and odors?

But What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansBut What About The Smell? Levi’s CEO Advises Against Washing JeansPanicAttack / Shutterstock.com

On the one hand, clothes should be washed whenever necessary. On the other hand, jeans are a sort of a uniform designed to be worn frequently and to get dirty, aren’t they? Besides, it is not a delicate fabric to be hand washed only. So, what do you think about this: is Chip Bergh right in his arguments or would you like to object?